Exploring The Attractions In Hobart; Maritime History And Cultural Heritage

0
116

The traditional but original port city of Hobart is the gateway to the spectacular island of Tasmania, and although it is much more compact than many Australian cities, it still has many historic and cultural sites, and it is worth the effort. worth spending a few days here, before visiting the rest of the island.

The majority of visitors will have traveled great distances to get to Tasmania and will be keen to get their directions right. After all, this could be a unique adventure, and knowing which sites will suit your interests is therefore very important. One solution is to consider incorporating a hop-on hop-off bus tour upon arrival in Hobart, which will take you directly to the city’s most popular attractions and tourist spots, and this article will give you an idea of ​​how to explore Hobart. of such a tour, and you can expect to see.

Maritime history: Because Hobart is a port, the focus is on many maritime attractions. Sullivan’s Cove, for example (where Hobart’s first settlers landed in 1804), is one of the first stops on the bus tour. You will also return to this area at the end of your visit, where you can explore Victoria Docks, the harbor and Elizabeth Street Pier. References to the sea are everywhere, from play equipment in Princess Park to old cottages in the fishing village of Battery Point.

The past of convicts: The bus stops that refer to the correspondence of convicts in the city are also interesting for history buffs. You can visit the Cascades Female Factory, for example, which was a workshop for women prisoners in the early 19th century. Then there is the prison chapel, which is part of the old Hobart prison. It was there that the convicts attended their compulsory religious services in the 19th century.

READ ALSO;
Poland Tour - Everything You Need to Know About Studying in Poland

Natural beauty: If you’re looking for something a little more uplifting, you can get off the bus at the Botanical Garden, which has 6,500 varieties of plants, many of which are from Tasmania. There’s everything from a Japanese garden to a subantarctic plant house here – enough to keep plant lovers happy all day!

We should not forget the exceptional landscape of Hobart. As you travel through the city, you cannot fail to admire the magnificent Mount Wellington in the distance. The views from your open-top bus are a definite plus, and you can get great snapshots along the route.

Cultural heritage: There are two museums to visit on the bus tour route. You can choose to go to the Tasmanian Museum, which focuses on the history, art, and culture of Tasmania and also has an art collection. Otherwise, there is the Maritime Museum, which has models of ships, paintings, images, photographs and other exhibits related to the sea.

Shopping possibilities: there are stops during the bus tour that allow you to browse the contents of your heart. You can try the Sandy Bay Shopping Village, for example, or you can jump at Salamanca Place. This region is famous for its Saturday market and has renovated warehouses, bars and cafes to visit. Everyone – locals and tourists alike – comes down to the area to enjoy good food, music, and great deals, of course!

READ ALSO;
The Essential Tourist's Guide to Malta Attractions - Walks Around Malta

If you have time, you can add section to your bus journey. You can combine it with a visit to the Cadbury factory for a chocolate visit, a trip to Mount Wellington or a visit to the Cascades brewery. That way, if time is short (or if you just prefer to let someone else organize), you can adapt your visit even more.

Australia’s most southerly city, Hobart snuggles at the foot of kunanyi/Mount Wellington along the estuary of the Derwent River – a beautiful setting, which belies its grim past. This vibrant capital of Tasmania was once a brutal penal colony, where convicts were sentenced to years of hard labor. But today, the city has embraced its rich history and culture, and its handsome convict-built architecture and fascinating museums and galleries are some of the city’s top tourist attractions.

Thanks to its deep-water harbor, Hobart also boasts a rich seafaring tradition. Sailing is still a popular pastime, and the city is the end point for the iconic summertime Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race. Year-round, visitors and locals flock to the waterfront to feast on fresh seafood and gaze out at the yachts bristling in the harbor. Find the best places to visit in this friendly state capital, with our list of the top attractions in Hobart, Tasmania.

READ ALSO;
10 Random Facts About Iceland, Its History and Its Culture

1. See the View from the Summit of kunanyi / Mount Wellington

A striking feature of the mountain is the Organ Pipes, a cliff of dolerite columns and a famous rock-climbing venue. A walk from the Springs to Sphinx Rock on the way up to the Pinnacle offers impressive views of these shard-like rock formations. Bushwalking trails cater to all abilities, and you can follow the safe boardwalks to the very edge of the precipitous escarpment. It’s a good idea to bring warm clothes for protection against frequent icy winds and changing weather.

2. Salamanca Place & Salamanca Market

One of the most popular attractions in Salamanca Place is the Saturday Salamanca Markets. More than 300 vendors sell everything from handcrafted woodwork and jewelry to ceramics, glassware, and fresh fruit and vegetables. (Shoppers who are looking for things to do in Hobart on Sunday should also head to Farm Gate Marketon Bathurst Street, where you’ll find the best variety of farm-fresh Tasmanian produce).

3. Port Arthur Day Trip

The brutal penal colony history of World Heritage-listed Port Arthur, 95 kilometers southeast of Hobart, seems strangely at odds with its stunning location on the tip of the Tasman Peninsular. In 1830, Governor Sir George Arthur founded this settlement where Tasmania’s most infamous convicts were sentenced to backbreaking labor. Today, Port Arthur is one of Tasmania’s top tourist sites and a poignant reminder of the hardships of convict life. You can tour the guard tower, sandstone church, hospital, prison, and museum. At night, the lantern-lit ghost tours are sure to send a chill down your spine.

READ ALSO;
Unmissable Tour for all Travellers - Four excellent Beaches in Sydney, Australia

4. MONA: Museum of Old and New Art

Opened in 2011, the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) is one of Hobart’s most talked-about attractions. This provocative private collection of modern art and antiquities is housed underground and offers interactive interpretation through portable touch screen devices. Described as a “subversive adult Disneyland,” the gallery displays confronting works of art ranging from an Egyptian sarcophagus to a machine that turns food into brown goo.

5. Stroll along the Battery Point Sculpture Trail

The old harbor quarter of Battery Point is like an open-air museum, and you can explore its fascinating history and beautiful convict-built architecture on the two-kilometer Battery Point Sculpture Trail. Named after a gun battery that once occupied the promontory, this charming seaside Hobart suburb is lined with quaint 19th-century cottages, boutique hotels, and restaurants. Begin your tour at Salamanca Place, and as you stroll along this scenic route, look for the nine sculptures, which are actually numbers linked to a story about each historic attraction, referring to either a date, quantity, weight, or distance.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here